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Archive for the ‘Footnotes at Suite101’ Category

Yes! FootNotes Since the Wilderness has made the United States History section of Cliopatria’s History Blogroll at the category-leader, the celebrated History News Network. Thanks to HNN for linking to us! Placement on the HNN blogroll has become a milestone among aspiring historians.

I want to thank all the readers who have come to FootNotes via HNN, and especially those who have sent in the encouraging notes. I truly appreciate your support.

Since we’re talking about links, here are a few more:

FootNotes now has its own Facebook page. I hope you will visit and “like” it, or add it to your page’s favorites. I am always happy to swap appropriate blogroll and fan page links.

My hunch is that teachers are preparing handouts for upcoming US history units, because the stats for three of my recent articles at Suite101 have been high. Then again, perhaps we just can’t get enough of the inimitable Edmund Andros. To see why, follow these:

(NEW): The Dominion of New England, Edmund Andros & Leisler’s Rebellion

Mercantilism, Navigation Acts, and the Dominion of New England

The New England Confederation United Four English Colonies

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Early German immigrants to the lower counties made Pennsylvania a very interesting place. Footnotes will be rooting around in the history of the radical German sectarians and, in particular, those connected in various ways to the communes of The Chapter of Perfection, more commonly known as The Woman in the Wilderness, and the Ephrata Cloister.

The curious may find their dancing and dining pleasure enhanced by:

The Chapter of Perfection, or Woman in the Wilderness

Woman in the Wilderness



Woman in the Wilderness, America’s First Commune

Mystic Pietists, Rosicrucians, Protestants – Woman in the Wilderness, inspired by Johannes Kelpius, was America’s first commune, thanks to William Penn.

Essene Symbolism, Ephrata Cloister

Essene Symbol

Ephrata Cloister, a Heretical Commune in Early Pennsylvania

Celibate, pacifist, vegetarian, Conrad Beissel’s Rosicrucian Pietists made Ephrata Cloister the longest-lived and the most successful commune in America.

hospital at the battle of brandywine

The Battle of Brandywine



Pacifist Rosicrucians Nursed the Continental Army Troops

German Pietists at Ephrata Cloister provided the principal hospital and nursing assistance for the Continental Army troops after the Battles of Brandywine and Germantown.


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King Phillip’s War temporarily revitalized commitment to the New England Confederation and, early on, put the pact to its greatest test. For roughly the first six months of King Phillip’s War, the Confederation provided organization to the war efforts but, as skirmishes grew smaller, more isolated, the impact of the Confederation diminished.

John Winthrop Signing the New England Confederation

Signing the New England Confederation

During the phase of the war in which tiny bands of soldiers engaged in impromptu, isolated battles, the colonies required less cooperation at the supervisory level. The benefits of the alliance faded though disuse. The New England Confederation collapsed ultimately in 1684, when British courts vacated Massachusetts’ corporate charter.

John Quincy Adams spoke about the New England Confederation on several occasions. He clearly revered the agreement. It did not escape Adam’s notice that the colonies not only came to their Confederation without the King’s approval, they did not even seek it. The King had failed them. The colonists were beginning to think that what they did was no longer any of the King’s business.

The New England Confederation grew organically from

Edward Winslow signed the New England Confederation

Edward Winslow signed the New England Confederation

American soil, seeded and shaped by forces and needs with which England was out of touch, and for which she could provide scant help. Noting that, John Quincy Adams tacked the New England Confederation on the family tree of colonial agreements extending from the Mayflower Compact to the US Constitution.

Go here for my article addressing John Quincy Adam’s take on the New England Confederation.


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Two new pieces I’ve published at Suite101, but which qualify as Footnotes Since the Wilderness.

  • Joseph Bonaparte’s Place in the History of New Jersey

    Joseph Bonaparte Loved New Jersey

    The Bonaparte family tree and the history of New Jersey merged when Joseph Bonaparte built an estate at Point Breeze, near Bordentown, on the Delaware River. Look for more about early Bordentown in an upcoming post at FSTW. Tom Paine loved the place.

  • John Cleves Symmes, Hollow Earth Theory, and Edmond Halley

    The Hollow Earth Theory, an idea shared by John Cleves Symmes and Edmond Halley, was the basis of the first proposal for the US to mount a polar expedition.

    john_cleves_symmes_hollow_earth_globe

    The Hollow Earth Globe

    The concept behind the first proposal for the US to fund a polar expedition was full of holes, but so was some work by Edmond Halley.

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Howgate’s Preliminary Arctic Expedition and Polar Colonization

The Howgate Polar Colonization Plan featured two phases, the first of which was the Preliminary Arctic Expedition.

The ultimate goal of the Polar Colonization Plan was to establish a sustainable base from which to voyage even farther north—indeed, as far north as possible, across the hypothesized open polar sea to the geographic North Pole itself.

Howgate’s Preliminary Arctic Expedition can be seen as the first step to US participation in the First International Polar Year.

………the rest of the article is here.
For the intrigue surrounding Henry Howgate, please see my related article,

Captain Henry Howgate – Embezzler, Forger, US Army Signal Corps

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Joshua Huddy was Hanged like Nathan HaleA Continental Army hero and privateer with a petty criminal past, Joshua Huddy’s lynching – some say by Colonel Tye- precipitated the Asgill Affair, arguably the first ‘international incident’ in colonial America.

George Washington, Marie Antoinette, and King Louis XVI all got involved.

Read the whole article!

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Two years after New Jersey ratified its Gradual Emancipation Act, and forty years prior to an official declaration by New Jersey to outlaw slavery, newly freed slaves settled a radically different, unprecedented community in Skunk Hollow.

freed slaves, black history, skunk hollow

Skunk Hollow Marker, photo by Bill Coughlin, http://www.hmdb.org

In 1806, Jack Earnest, a freed slave, exchanged $87.50 for five acres near what is now Alpine, New Jersey.

Find out why it’s not the skunks that smell.

Please read the full article for further details.

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